A Stumbling Start

By malloryjwhite

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For proper formatting, view at Digital Mallory.

Our time at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology this week was exciting. Knowing which artifacts we wanted to work with, and dividing among ourselves we set to work photographing for our 3D models. Working with the uniforms, Amy, Sara, and I have a lot of accessories to deal with. We questioned which elements were going to be made 3D, and which ones we preferred to simply photograph. This forced us once again to question the value and contribution that 3D models can make to historical projects. Further, it necessitated contemplation over presentation—how would we set up a display we’d merely be photographing?

Here’s an example of a scene we set up:

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: this kind of hands on work should be mandatory–possibly even for fourth year undergraduate classes. Whether a student is in public history, or the general history stream, I believe everyone can benefit and gain new insight from encounters such as this. As students, we can employ skills we’ve practiced in other ways. Deciding which artifacts you want to include in your final project, how they fit into your piece, and how they should be presented all tap into ways that we deal with written sources. I’ve felt up to this point as though I’ve been stumbling along with this course–being unable to envision our project, or trying to decipher ways to use our artifacts effectively–all the while struggling to wrap my head around whether or not what I’m producing is “good” history.

Now, however, I feel as though I’m starting to get a feel for it all, as though I’m beginning to ask the right questions…

Technology, on the other hand, has other plans for me…

It would seem no amount of re-installing, keyboard smashing, or swearing can solve what ever problem 123D Catch has with my photos. The photos I took at the museum are fine, but somewhere in the processing/ “capturing” process of producing the 3D models, something goes awry. I’ve been discussing strategies with Shawn and my peers, and it seems I’m not the only one who’s been having trouble.

For the time being, more trial and error, research, and comfort food is needed.

Until next time,
Mallory

Source: Mallory